2013 CT Blues Society CD Release

October 17, 2013

It is exciting for the Connecticut Blues Society to make available a new compilation of songs from the musicians who play in our events. Sue Meeker invited musicians to submit original songs. The CTBS Board of Directors voted on the best 16 (one per artist). Washboard Pat Doyle (radio personality from WHUS) compiled the songs. The producer was River City Slim (radio personality from WWUH). John Bailey did an outstanding job on the cover illustration and graphic design (a colorful sign pointing to a juke joint, with vintage cars out front). The music was mastered by Colin Tilton, at Bar None Studio, in Northford, CT.


Out All Night comes from the title of the first song by Petey Hop. The horn introduction, followed by Petey’s bluesy guitar makes you want to head for a Blues Club and stay out all night. The swinging interaction of guitar and sax (Chris DiFrancesco) will inspire you to hear more blues.


“I’m A Free Man” is John Bailey is hitting the road, after a bad relationship. John’s strong Chicago style harp is given excellent backing by the Eric Ducoff Band. The heavy beat is provided by Nick Toscano (drums) and JB Berg (bass).


“Tired of Being Your Fool” (D Smith Blues Band) features the intense vocals and harp of Bob Orsi. Getting rid of a bad woman, and this time, not going back. T-Bone’s drums are laying down the beat.


“Big Big Lovin’” (Junior Krauss and The Shakes) leads with a rousing harp intro by Junior. Andy MacDonald is featured on vocals and guitar. Ben Boylan’s upright bass establishes a dance-able rockabilly beat.


“Hey Hey Baby” features Jay Willie’s electrifying slide guitar. His strong vocal lays down the law – He is warning his woman not to mess with him. The aggressive band helps Jay make his point.


“Donna Rose” was written by Mike Crandall for his album Just Livin The Blues. With Mike’s harp wailing, the band is cranking to the story of a wild girl, who is like a “Freight Train, running all the time”.


“Can’t take It No More” has Dan Stevens taking to the bottle to shake the pain of a bad relationship. Dan does some fine finger picking while moaning the blues. The horns give the song a New Orleans feeling.


“Rainy Day Front Porch Blues” finds Steve Balkun playing some low down blues – on his front porch, in the rain. Written by Steve and based on traditional blues. Strong vocal with dynamic slide guitar.


“All It Takes Is Money” is Mark Crofutt telling us that plenty of money will guarantee a good time. Cadillacs, big screen televisions, hot tubs, etc are all possible if you have the money. The accordion in the background places you in New Orleans. Love the deep slide sound.
“I Just Want To Dance” (River City Slim and the Zydeco Hogs) brings us into Cajun country. The song written by Peter Rost features the traditional accordion and zydeco beat that gets everyone dancing. The guitar (Toad Eckert) adds a contemporary sound. The song says “All I want to do is dance”, but does she believe him??


“Stone Cold” is Johnny Boots playing blues / rock at its best. He is making full use of his “guitar effects”, clear voice, and song we can relate to – “She is cooking with heat, but sometimes stone cold”. 


“5 Cars Later” is rockin blues by Paul Gabriel, “Drank a lot of whiskey, felt a lot of pain”, but it is upbeat and a great party song. Excellent piano by Joe Najmy.


“Meet Me” is a great slow dance by Easy Baby. Nice interplay of harp (Dave Robbins) and guitar (Trevor West), while Kelly Rago is singing the blues, in her sultry, sexy, soulful voice. Give before you take.


“Anti-Blues Pill” may save Ryan Hartt and the Blue Hearts from the deep blues. Ryan sings “ Not crazy, just a little ill, I just need my anti blues pill”. Ryan blows strong harp and Eric Ducoff is the perfect complement on guitar. Everyone contributes in this veteran band.


“Rob Me Blind” (Brandt Taylor) is a great combination of early rock and roll and Gulf Coast Blues. A great beat for a slow dance, a strong vocal, and a song on the country side of the blues. 


“Linin’ Track” is Joel Blumert performing a traditional gospel / blues field holler. This is where blues started – in the southern cotton fields.


The CTBS is proud of this compilation and sure it will be an excellent addition to your blues music collection.  [ ]

 

 

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